HOW DO I MEDITATE USING THE BREATH AS THE ANCHOR?

 

SIT – FEEL THE BREATH – WANDER OFF – COME BACK. NOW DO IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN!!!!

 In mindfulness we are trying to develop awareness of the present moment. We have chosen the breath as our anchor to develop awareness as it is readily available and always present.

*One can bring one’s attention to wherever you feel the breath most dominant. This could be your chest, abdomen, body or tip of the nostrils. I would invite you to experiment with bringing awareness to the tip of the nostrils as this is a focal and very sensitive spot to appreciate the breath.

*Bring your attention to the physical sensation of the movement of the breath at the tip of the nostrils.

*Be open to the multiple ways you can experience the breath. Is it smooth or irregular, deep or shallow, quite or loud, warm or cool?

*Allow yourself to be breathed by your body. There is no conscious control over the breath.

*Your attention will be drawn away from the breath and you will be off with thoughts of the past or future. This is normal. When your mind decides to come back to the breath don’t see that as a failure but as a positive part of meditation.

You are coming back to mindfulness of the present moment, the breath.

HOW IS MINDFULNESS DIFFERENT THAN RELAXATION, CONCENTRATION OR THINKING ABOUT MY PROBLEMS?

HOW IS MINDFULNESS DIFFERENT THAN RELAXATION, CONCENTRATION OR THINKING ABOUT MY PROBLEMS?

Mindfulness is an active process that directs one to be present in the moment and see the true nature of what one is experiencing with non-reactivity. It is allowing what is present to be held with the acceptance of mindfulness. There is no attempt to ignore, deny or think one’s way to an answer.
– Phil Blustein

WHY IS THE BREATH SUCH A GOOD OBJECT TO LEARN MINDFULNESS?

The breath is a great object to start to establish mindfulness. No one breath is the same as another breath. Every inhalation and exhalation comes to an end. We don’t tend to personalize a breath and call it our own. In examining the breath we are able to see the true nature of reality. It is always changing and impermanent. Can we also develop the same self-less awareness of the breath for every other object?

– Phil Blustein